Latest Conferences

We are proud to showcase our research at premier national and international conferences. Below you can find a selection of our upcoming conference presentations. For a full list of conference presentations, click here.

Enjoy the read! 

 
 
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PAPER presentation: “I’m just as bad as they are”: When one ideological psychological contract breach leads to another. 

Jones, S. K., & Vantilborgh, T. (November 2018).

 

Psychological contract (PC) breach has been a central focus of the PC literature since the concept’s inception, with scholars continuing to refine our understanding of how different PC inducements (i.e., relational, transactional, and ideological) elicit different employee responses. Despite these advances, the majority of the focus has been on how organizational under-fulfillment of PC obligations results in negative outcomes for the employee, and how the employee responds towards the organization (i.e., decreases in performance). This dyadic approach however, does not fully capture the social and dynamic context of an organization and the numerous interactions and exchange relationships an employee is involved in. With a focus on value- and ideology-based PCs (iPC), this talk will introduce how organizational breaches to the employee may have a trickle-down effect where as a result, employees are likely to breach the ideology with their beneficiaries.

 

Presented at the Biannual Psychological Contract Small Group Conference, Melbourne, VIC.

 
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PAPER presentation: “We’re always going above and beyond”: The relationship between ideological psychological contract breach, work effort, stress, and burnout over time. 

Jones, S. K., & Griep, Y. (November 2018).

 

Employees are driven to pursue meaningful work, to contribute to a greater cause or set of values, and to feel engaged and fulfilled. While meaningful work can be fulfilling for employees and is associated with numerous positive outcomes, it can also be a “double-edged sword” where employees are willing to make personal sacrifices to ensure that the values of their occupation are maintained (Bunderson & Thompson, 2009). The purpose of the present study was to examine how these experiences of meaningful work influence the nature of the psychological contracts (PC; Rousseau, 2001) that employees form with their organizations and how the central importance of a valued cause or purpose shapes how employees engage in sense-making after having perceived a PC breach. Focusing on ideological psychological contracts (iPC; Thompson & Bunderson, 2003), this study provides a data-driven proof-of-concept to outline how perceptions of iPC breach relates to healthcare worker’s increased work effort over time, and how this process might eventually lead to the experience of strain and burnout.

 

Presented at the Biannual Psychological Contract Small Group Conference, Melbourne, VIC.

 
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PAPER presentation: Academic engagement trajectories and performance: Learning to love or honeymoon hangover?

Griep, Y., & Wingate, T. G. (2018, August; Nominated for Best Paper in Management Education Award). 

 

How does students’ academic engagement develop, and how does this development influence academic performance? Process research on students’ early academic experiences has been scarce due to a lack of appropriate high-density-high-frequency research designs. We thus have very limited knowledge on how students become academically engaged and how its development influences their academic success. Drawing on the analogue of workplace commitment, we extracted three process-theoretical accounts regarding how students’ academic engagement might evolve over time: (1) Learning to Love; (2) Honeymoon Hangover; and (3) High, Moderate, or Low Match. We measured 180 students’ weekly levels of engagement across 18 weeks (2778 observations) of post-secondary education. At the end of this first term, we received indicators of objective performance (passed courses and average GPA). Our results confirmed our theoretical trajectories of academic engagement. Moreover, and in line with expectations based on Goal Setting Theory, we found that Learning to Love and High Match students outperformed all other students, whereas Low Match students performed worse than all other students. Our findings illustrate the utility of a more nuanced, temporal approach to the study of engagement, and carry both theoretical and practical implications to understand student development and learning potential. 

 

Presented at the 78th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, Chicago, IL.

 
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PAPER presentation: Revenge is sweet, when you’re in charge.

Neville, L., Griep, Y., & Hershcovis, S. M. (2018, August).

 

The “tit for tat” model of incivility posits that when someone is mistreated at work, they respond in kind, and this response may escalate. A significant body of research has supported the idea that employees take revenge at work in response to a range of perceived slights (e.g., Aquino, Tripp, & Bies, 2001; 2006; Mitchell & Ambrose, 2007). But what are the consequences of workplace revenge? Although would-be avengers may think that revenge will make them feel better, when they actually take revenge, research has found that they feel worse than those who did not take revenge (Carlsmith, Wilson, & Gilbert, 2008). However, status differences among employees suggest that some people (e.g., those with high status) are able to exact revenge more freely than others, and this freedom to engage in vengeful acts may mean that revenge yields satisfaction for some and displeasure for others. These differences in how revenge makes people feel may have downstream effects for job performance. In the present study, we examine the avenger’s affective reactions following revenge, and the subsequent performance outcomes for avengers.

 

Presented at the 78th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, Chicago, IL.

 
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PAPER presentation: Making sense of observer reactions to witnessed mistreatment at work.

Reich, T. C., Hershcovis, M. S., Griep, Y., & Stride, C. B. (2018, August).